Growing Possibilities, A blog by XiteBio | XiteBio welcomes you to our blog
830
home,paged,page-template,page-template-blog-compound,page-template-blog-compound-php,page,page-id-830,paged-7,page-paged-7,qode-listing-1.0.1,qode-social-login-1.0,qode-news-1.0.2,qode-quick-links-1.0,qode-restaurant-1.0,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-title-hidden,qode_grid_1300,qode-content-sidebar-responsive,qode-theme-ver-13.0,qode-theme-bridge,bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.4.4,vc_responsive
XiteBio / 31.10.2012

Many Midwest farmers choose not to use an inoculant for their soybeans. They feel, due to the high number of nitrogen fixing bacteria already in the soil, that inoculating offers little benefit. However, after the record-setting drought of 2012, they may want to reconsider. Jim Beuerlein and Harold Watters, agronomists with the Ohio State University, explain that rhizobia bacteria, the nitrogen fixers responsible for forming root nodules, prefer moist conditions with a soil temperature range of 40-80°F (4-27°C). When soils get too hot or too dry, as many...

XiteBio / 17.10.2012

2012 will be a profitable year for Canadian agriculture. That's the conclusion of a report released by the Bank of Montreal. Canadian agricultural output is expected to improve 7.5% by the end of the year when compared to 2011, growth that is largely supported by more profitable crop production. While agriculture is always vulnerable in a constantly changing economy, there are reasons to believe that this growth can be sustained: Countries with growing populations are looking for food, and see Canada as a valuable source. The needs of international markets are affecting the decisions of...

XiteBio / 04.10.2012

Barely half of U.S. soybean farmers are aware that the oil and protein level in their seed directly impacts their profits. That is according to a survey done by the United Soybean Board in 2010. Increasing yields is commonly seen as the driving force to higher profits, but this may be coming at the expense of the quality of the seed being produced. U.S. soybean oil and meal production has recently been on a slow and steady decline. If the amount of protein and oil that a processor can extract...

XiteBio / 25.09.2012

Aside from irrigation, there is no sure way to avoid the impact of drought on crops. Irrigation is not always possible, however, so other management strategies must be used to try and reduce the effects. Minnesota Farm Guide recently interviewed Joe Pedretti of the Midwest Organic and Sustainable Education Service (MOSES), who offered several practices used by organic farmers that are designed to help maintain soil moisture during dry seasons. Cover crops: They increase soil organic matter while protecting the soil surface. Cover crops hold the soil surface together, which...