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XiteBio / 19.10.2017

After a year that saw above-average yields for wheat and canola despite dry conditions in much of North America, many farmers’ bins are brimming to the top with this year’s harvest, especially in the Canadian prairies. But all that grain can take a toll on your soil, depleting it of critical nutrients. The following table lists uptake and removal rates of major crops in Western Canada: Crop   N (lb/ac) P2O5 (lb/ac) K2O (lb/ac) S (lb/ac) Spring Wheat Uptake 76-93 29-35 65-80 8-10 Removal 54-66 21-26 16-19 4-5 Winter Wheat Uptake 61-74 27-34 64-78 9-11 Removal 47-57 23-28 15-19 6-8 Canola Uptake 100-123 46-57 73-89 17-21 Removal 61-74 33-40 16-20 10-12 Soybeans Uptake 160-200 28-35 84-155 12 Removal 130-140 28-30 48-50 4 Corn Uptake 138-168 57-69 116-141 13-16 Removal 87-107 39-48 25-30 6-7 Peas Uptake 138-168 38-46 123-150 11-14 Removal 105-129 31-38 32-39 6-7 Lentils Uptake 82-101 22-27 69-84 8-10 Removal 55-67 17-20 29-36 4-5 Barley Uptake 100-122 40-49 96-117 12-14 Removal 70-85 30-37 23-28 6-8 Faba Beans Uptake 257-314 89-108 229-280 12-15 Removal 154-188 55-67 47-57 6-8 Source: Canadian Fertilizer Institute Uptake refers to the amount of each nutrient that a crop takes up...

XiteBio / 31.08.2015

Harvest is when farmers reap the reward of a well-nodulated legume crop, and can see the result of the inoculant first used during seeding. Unfortunately, there are times when adequate nodulation does not occur, even when an inoculant has been used. Listed below are several reasons as to why this might happen: soil pH: rhizobia struggle to survive when pH is below 6 or above 8 soil moisture: extremely dry soils can cause rhizobia to dry out and die before they invade the roots, while water-logged soils can reduce available...

XiteBio / 26.06.2015

Promoting a healthy soil environment has taken on greater importance as farmers seek to find new ways to maximize crop output. Maintaining a healthy and active microbial atmosphere is important considering the many ways microbes contribute to agriculture. Soil microbes have key roles in plant decomposition and nutrient recycling. Many microbes also directly impact plants by aiding growth or offering protection against pests or stresses. Improving the structure of the soil itself is also one of the benefits of a biologically healthy soil. Microbes help maintain strength and...

XiteBio / 12.06.2015

Crop inputs are generally thought of as a way to enhance the soil by adding something that is currently lacking. These can include fertilizers that add needed nutrients, or various pesticides to provide extra protection against a disease or pest. However, there are examples of where what is needed already exists, but just not available to the plant. One of the features of ag biological products is that some have the ability to access these otherwise unreachable benefits and make them available to the crop. Perhaps the most common...